Pay Inequality

Pay Inequality
Microsoft’s new CEO, Satya Nadella, created quite a furor this month at a conference to celebrate women in technology. With more than 8000 people from around the world hearing him speak on “Building the Career of Your Dreams”, he was asked about advice for women who are uncomfortable requesting a raise. His answer sparked outrage and set Twitter on fire. Rightfully so. Trust the system? Rely on karma? You must be kidding!

In spite of Nadella’s faux pas, I respect that following the speech he admitted he was wrong and apologized for his answer, both publicly and in a letter to all Microsoft employees. In a follow up interview Nadella said he spent several days reflecting on the situation, admitted to learning from and being humbled by the experience, and immediately worked with Microsoft’s HR department to evaluate pay inequities. He also wants to take it a step further by addressing opportunity inequality. Although some question his sincerity, I’m choosing to believe in it – at least for now. The actions he takes will be the real test of his sincerity..

My passion for helping women with money challenges was sparked by my own corporate experience with pay inequality, the challenges I faced as a corporate manager advocating for employees’ pay, the training I received on empowering women around money, and the clients I’ve worked with to address earnings and other money situations. One might think business owners would be free of issues around earning differences because they set their own prices, but that’s just not true. So whether as employees or as business owners, there are challenges to address, and it’s time for action.

Many factors play into pay inequality. Equal pay laws were implemented in 1963 and have been tweaked since then. The laws have certainly benefited many – including my mother. In the early ’70s she received an unexpected pay increase and retroactive pay when it was discovered that she was paid less than her male counterparts for the same type of work. But even with equal pay laws, inequality exists.

Laws and the best actions of businesses may never solve all of the inequalities. But why wait for them? There are actions you can take to address the inequalities yourself.

A factor to pay inequality that women do have control over is negotiation – both when accepting a new position and while in an existing job. I appreciate that in Nadella’s letter to the Microsoft employees he said, “If you think you deserve a raise, you should just ask”.

Carnegie Mellon found that only 7% of female MBA graduates had attempted to negotiate their starting salary, compared with 57% of their male counterparts. MBA graduates aside, its reported that men negotiate 4 – 8 times more often than women. Linda Babcock, author and economic professor, says women metaphorically choose “going to the dentist” to describe the negotiation process, while men choose “winning a ballgame”.

Why the discrepancy? Women can face a number of challenges in negotiation: never being taught to negotiate, being uncomfortable with negotiation, not understanding their worth, and fearing the repercussions of asking for what they want. That doesn’t even take into account the often hidden money beliefs that sabotage many women’s earnings.

Is it time take your power back and start negotiating? Below are some tips and relevant life experiences to support you.

1. Learn negotiation skills. This could be via books, classes, modeling, mentoring, and other resources. I was fortunate to take a class on negotiation early in my corporate career.

2. Improve your negotiation skills by practicing. Everything is negotiable so there are numerous opportunities every day. In my negotiation class we were challenged to go to retail stores such as Nordstrom and negotiate. Done!

3. “No ask. No get”. It may be scary to ask for what you want, but doing what’s scary, even when your knees are knocking, is one of the ways women earn higher incomes. Asking is what helped me achieve a six figure salary in the corporate world and is also a necessary skill in having a successful business.

4. Ask for what you want with respect and with supporting information. While a corporate manager, a clerical employee demanded a raise simply because she had a bachelor’s degree. Although I applaud her for asking and appreciate her educational achievement, a respectful and well thought out pitch would have been appreciated.

5. Understand that the answer may be yes, but could also be no. When I approached my manager armed with supporting information about a pay inequity, she evaluated my information, reportedly did some research, and ultimately told me I was “appropriately paid”.

6. Know that you may have to ask more than once. I didn’t take no for an answer. I took the supporting information to my boss’s boss, and ultimately got an increase.

7. Appreciate any steps that are taken to resolve pay inequities. It took more than two years and several different actions to fully resolve my pay inequity. I was grateful for the steps that were taken, while also keeping the situation visible to the two new managers I had during that time period.

8. Know that even if men and woman were to start out making equal pay, there could eventually be legitimate differences in pay (for either men or women) based on seniority, merit, and production quality or quantity. This seems fair, but could also be an avenue for creating illegal inequality, overtly or inadvertently.

9. You may need to make changes. One of my clients worked diligently to resolve her pay inequity and advance in her position. After some time it became apparent that with her current manager it would be impossible for her to achieve those goals. She was frustrated while also being comfortable at a company where she had worked for more than a dozen years. She finally decided her goals were more important than her comfort. Today she is thrilled in a new position where she negotiated more than a 50% salary increase while receiving other rewards and the respect she dearly wanted.

If you’re experiencing pay inequality, what actions will you take to control your situation? When you do, not only will you empower yourself, but a potential bonus is that your actions may also help other women.

Are Your Listening?

Listening

A friend who is in her mid-40s told me that in spite of her professional accomplishments, her material possessions, and a fabulous daughter, she feels a lack of passion. Nothing is exciting for her any longer. Nothing sparks her interest. She may want to make a career change, but has no idea what she might want to do next. Like words from an old song, she’s contemplating “is that all there is?”

I experienced similar feelings prior to leaving my corporate career nearly a dozen years ago. Lack of passion, waning interest, and career dilemmas are common as women transition through mid-life. These challenges are written about in one of my favorite books – “The Breaking Point: How the Female Midlife Crisis Is Transforming Today’s Women”. Although Shellenbarger’s book was published eight years ago, it’s still relevant. I continue to hear the challenges of mid-life from many women I know personally and professionally.

What I learned from my mid-life experience is the lack of passion and emptiness is a signal that it’s time to change direction. Ignore the gentle nudges and they’ll get progressively stronger. Ignore them long enough and you may encounter illness, injury, accident, loss, or some other traumatic experience in order to get you to pay attention. Although it took me several years to make a career change, I was listening and am grateful my nudges didn’t have to progress to the destructive stage.

Much like the women in Shellenbarger’s book, my passion, creativity, and fulfillment were renewed when I took the leap and made the change. I found remarkable opportunities for personal, professional, and spiritual growth, and have been blessed with a wealth of people to guide and support me along the way. I was shown the truth of the saying “when the student is ready, the teacher appears”.

What nudges are you receiving, about your career or another aspect of your life? Are you listening or trying to ignore their existence? What will it take to get your attention?

Celebrate

Celebrate

It surprises me that we’re already into the eight month of the year. Have you taken the time to stop and celebrate your business achievements throughout the year? In our busy world it’s easy to get focused on day to day activities and forget to celebrate, or even recognize our achievements. Clients tell me that stopping to remember their accomplishments is one of the values they find in the Coaching Prep sheets they complete prior to each coaching session.

Is it time for you to stop, remember, and celebrate your wins? If you pay attention, there are many opportunities to celebrate. There may be large achievements such as closing a deal you’ve worked on all year, receiving a promotion, or completing a project. There may also be the smaller accomplishments of completing one step in a project, obtaining a new client, being on track with your weekly sales goals, or even making a difficult decision.

Learn to create awareness for your accomplishments and celebrate or reward them appropriately. For one of my clients taking a two hour plus lunch to attend a yoga class is a meaningful reward for completing her sales calls earlier in the week.

Think of at least four past accomplishments, large or small, that you haven’t celebrated. Make August the month to catch up by celebrating or rewarding yourself for one past achievement each week of this month.

Sabbatical

Summer Hammock
Do you remember the joy and freedom of summer breaks from school? Throughout decades of work that started as a young teenager, until twelve years ago I had only taken two short breaks (five and six weeks) when my two daughters were born. I was longing for a summer break, or what working adults call a sabbatical. I considered buying a fifth week of vacation for two consecutive years and using those weeks back to back,at the end of one year and the beginning of the next year, to create a ten week sabbatical.

Instead, I left my corporate career and took a sabbatical before starting my business. Sleeping long hours the first two months and receiving comments about my refreshed and younger looking face made me realize just how exhausted I had become. The luxury of sleeping without an alarm clock, spending two months on a Caribbean island, and simply having nine months to do whatever I wanted rejuvenated not only my face, but my body, mind, and spirit.

I’ve been intrigued with the sabbatical stories I’ve come across this past year. Sebastien, a business owner, wanted to take six months off to travel with his girlfriend (and propose to her during the trip). His goal was to only work an hour a day. Although not a true sabbatical, it is a radical departure for a business owner. Sebastien’s mastermind group told him he didn’t have the proper team or systems in place to take the trip without blowing up his business. But that didn’t stop him. Instead, he put some systems in place, went on his trip, and danced around the world with his fiancé. It’s a beautiful story of being told no, but choosing instead to do what matters most. Watch this magical journey Travel the World.

Stephan Sagmeister’s TED Talk on “The Power of Taking Time Off” was intriguing. Sagmeister is a designer who closes his New York studio every seven years. He explains the often overlooked value of time off and how he and his employees take a year off to rejuvenate and refresh their creative outlook.

In an article, Zahra Ebrahim, the owner of a design studio, talks about the constant struggle between “loving to do” and “having to do”. Sagmeister’s story inspired her to implement a two-month Summer Sabbatical for the company. If you e-mail their studio during those two months, you’ll receive, in part, this reply:
We give our entire team the summer off to go on a creative journey, to rejuvenate, to reconnect to ideas that make them tick. It makes our work better, it makes our ideas richer, and makes our jobs feel more like dream jobs.

The diary-like book “Radical Sabbatical” was interesting. It’s about a high powered corporate couple who put their belongings in storage, rented their home, and moved to Costa Rica for a year. It’s an insightful book filled with numerous challenges and abundant lessons, including how to live with more ease on their planned return to Costa Rica.

Do any of these stories intrigue you? Inspire you? Make you want to take a sabbatical? What would it take for you to make it happen? From just a few stories, we have evidence that whether a business owner or employee, if the desire is strong enough – it can happen.

Power of Words

thepoweroflanguage
How much time to do spend thinking about your words? The words you choose for emails, letters, web site content, conversations and presentations directly impact your chances of making sales.

Carefully chosen words bolster confidence in you, your company and the solutions you are presenting. Do your homework, base what you say on accurate information and prepare yourself for success. Use the amazing power of words to gain the confidence of others. State with strong affirmative language and demonstrate authority with your tone.

Below are a few effective phrases to think and say to get results with and through people:
• I am responsible
• I am up to the challenge
• You can count on me
• Consider it done
• I’m on top of it
• You’ve come to the right place
• I give you my word

Notice the difference between “I’ll try” and “You can count on me to get it done”.
For the next month, focus on and examine your speech. Pay attention to what you say and how you say it. Pay close attention to how people respond to you when you speak with confidence and conviction. Improve your sales by improving your use of words.

Making a Difference

IMG_0486#2

Making a difference in the world. It’s how our life matters and is exactly why I left the corporate world more than eleven years ago. I longed for a new career that would have more direct impact on the lives of others. Although I was clueless about what that work would be when I flew from the “safety and security”of the corporate nest, I trusted that I would find a career that made a difference. From the feedback I’ve received through the years, as well as in my heart, I know that I’ve accomplished what I intended.

Making a difference was ratcheted up a few notches for me this year. As a passionate traveler, I’ve been to a number of countries throughout the world. Unlike many employees, while in the corporate world I used every single day of my vacation time. Now, as a business owner, I continue to make vacation a priority. And yet, until recently, vacations were always about me.

That’s not true for my friend Debbie McNeill. I knew that a number of years ago she had worked for a month in an orphanage in India, but was inspired when I recently learned she had also done volunteer vacations in Jamaica and Mexico.

As Debbie and I planned a long awaited safari vacation, it was no accident that we independently stumbled upon the Make a Difference Now link on our travel agent’s website. Through it we learned of various opportunities including travel to Tanzania, Patagonia, Nepal, and Peru that support orphans in Tanzania and India. Since we were headed to Tanzania, we gladly shortened our safari plans and restructured our vacation to start with a week of volunteer work with the Make a Difference Now (MAD) non-profit and the Kilimanjaro Kids Care orphanage.

Each day we spent with these smart, beautiful, happy, caring, and polite children became more important to me than the long dreamed of safari. We distributed books and planted trees at their school; played and visited with them in their backyard; let them take pictures with our cameras (scary, but a definite hit); set up and taught them to use a donated iPad; helped them write letters to their sponsors & donors; shared with them the power of vision boards; distributed clothes, shoes, and school supplies that were brought with us or shopped for with donations from our families and friends. We were making a difference and every day we were at the orphanage brought smiles to the faces of these children.

We were able to spend special times with the four oldest children, Deo, Revo, Neema & Omega. We watched a movie together, shared meals with them, and took them shopping for the children’s clothes. Although they were taking computer classes each morning, they had more available time than most of the children. They had completed secondary school a few months prior and were anxiously awaiting the test results to determine whether they would be able to start Advanced Level (pre-college) classes in April. We were as excited as they were to learn the results, and on our final day in Tanzania learned they had all passed with flying colors – and one even had the top test score!

At the United Nations World Humanitarian Day in 2012, Beyonce sang I Was Here. It’s about living, loving, and making a difference. Debbie and I listened to that song the last morning of our week with the children. We both ended up in tears. We know we made a difference in the lives of these children. but it wasn’t a one way street. They helped us with the Swahili we were learning, taught us some of their songs, danced with us, gave us hundreds of smiles and just as many hugs, and on our last day with them, thanked us for what we had done, encircled us, jointly laid their hands on our heads and prayed for us. Those children definitely made a difference in our lives too.

There are many ways to make a difference. What will you do? If helping orphans speaks to your heart, learn more about MAD, see the children’s profiles, and learn the numerous ways you can make a difference in these children’s lives, whether it’s while traveling to another country or from your own city, visit Make a Difference Now

Unplug

Unplugged from Technology
What Would It Be Like To Unplug?

Technology. Do you love it?  Hate it? Or have a love/hate relationship with it?  Has its promise of time-saving and efficiency become just another vehicle for distraction, stress, and poor health?

“Unplugging” from technology is a movement, actually a backlash, that’s been gaining momentum over the past half a dozen years. At the heart of the movement is getting back to a purer, more present, more engaging way of life. Think Thoreau. It’s intriguing, and especially interesting, that the core of this movement is in the San Francisco area – home to technology’s Silicon Valley.

Evidence that unplugging is a growing movement is apparent in the various ways this trend is being implemented:There’s the  National Day of Unplugging each March (this year its fifth year);  Detox Week in April, made visible by musician John Mayer; Digital Detox Vacation Resorts, the premier resort being Earthshine Mountain Lodge in  North Carolina; Technology Shabbats, weekly from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday (since 2008); Walden Zones, with designated tech-free zones in your home; and Give Up Your Smartphone, started by a restaurant worker, irked by people’s preoccupation for texting and tweeting during meals.

I was greatly intrigued with a professional San Francisco couple with two children. They decided that technology, instead of helping, distracts us from more meaningful interactions. They made the decision to unplug after their first child was born, wanting their children to have a tactile and immersive childhood.

Their unplugged lifestyle doesn’t include TV (except every two years for the Olympics), radio, cable modem, fax machine, video games, or paper shredder.

The kitchen is without a microwave, electronic coffee maker, ice maker, automated oven, digital clocks, electric can-opener, store-bought flour, prepared juice, or packaged foods.

Instead, they’ve gone extremely low-tech. They use a stovetop coffeemaker, hand crush ice, use analog clocks, make calls on a corded rotary dial phone (do you even remember those?), hand juice, and grind flour.

They have found simple pleasures in their low-tech life: friends lingering at dinner conversations without cell phone interruptions; reading a daily print newspaper; taking the kids hiking and biking; and baking their own bread. Other benefits are feeling more restored, present, refreshed, and sleeping better.

For another reason, some companies, including technology company Google, are insisting that their workers unplug for certain parts of the day.  They recognize that to innovate, employees need time to unplug.

This growing movement is important, not only for life engagement and innovation, but for our health. Author Kim John Payne says excessive connectedness is straining our bodies and our brains. Neurologically we can’t  be on high alert any more than 1/3 of our waking life. With the 10+ hours of high alert many people experience because of technology, we become adrenaline and cortisol junkies – both harmful to our health.

How does being unplugged for a day, a week, or for a longer period of time sound to you? Does it feel scary? Refreshing? Both?

I know I’m strongly tied to technology and do feel its weight. I don’t plan to go without it completely, but more and more I’m looking for ways to lessen its impact. On my vacation later this year, I’ll do what I’ve sometimes done in the past – go mostly sans technology. After all, I do want to take my camera and get some great pictures, which will only be seen by others after I return home.

 

Benefits of Gratitude

GratitudeWhat are the Benefits of Gratitude?

Research shows numerous benefits, including its strong and consistent association with greater happiness. Gratitude helps people feel more positive emotions, relish good experiences, improve their health, deal with adversity, and build strong relationships. Quite a payback, don’t you think?

More specifically, researchers at UC Davis discovered those who practice grateful thinking have fewer symptoms of illness, see their doctors less, exercise more, and feel better about their lives as a whole.

In another study at the University of Pennsylvania, participants wrote and personally delivered a letter to someone who had never been thanked for his or her kindness. The participants immediately showed a huge increase in their happiness scores – with benefits lasting for a month.

In relationships, a study found that individuals who took time to express gratitude for their partner not only felt more positive toward the other person but also felt more comfortable expressing concerns about their relationship.

Wharton School of Business found managers who remember to say “thank you” to people who work for them may find those employees feel motivated to work harder. For example, a group of fund-raisers received a pep talk from the director of annual giving who told them she was grateful for their efforts. Those who heard the positive message made 50% more fund-raising calls than those who didn’t.

Aren’t the benefits of gratitude a huge payoff for a small effort? Although it’s customary to express gratitude on Thanksgiving Day, how many people continue it past that one day? Are you curious how additional gratitude might improve your life? It doesn’t matter what your current level of gratitude, you can cultivate it further and experience the benefits. Apply it to past experiences, current situations, or the future and see what happens.

As you explore adding gratitude to your life, consider creating one or more of these habits:

• Say “thank you” to at least one person a day
• Post on a social media site one thing you’re grateful for each day
• Say either aloud or to yourself at least five things you’re grateful for each day
• Write daily in a gratitude journal at least five things for which you’re grateful
• Send a thank you note each day or each week
• Leave thank you notes for the loved ones in your home
• Leave thank you notes for your employees and co-workers
• Take 10 – 15 minutes to go on a gratitude binge and identify everything for
which you’re grateful
• If you don’t already have a Thanksgiving gratitude ritual, start one this year

For further inspiration on the benefits of gratitude, read John Kralik’s personal journey: A Simple Act of Gratitude: How Learning to Say Thank You Changed my Life.

Planning

How do you react to the word “planning”? Some people love it… some try to avoid it… and others accept it because they know its value. No matter what your opinion on planning, it’s a structure that helps people achieve results in businesses and in life. Even the simplest business or life planning can help provide greater clarity, better focus, and faster results.

Fast forward to December 31, 2014. What successes are you celebrating? What challenges did you have this past year? What obstacles did you overcome? What did you learn? What are you disappointed about?

If you haven’t already started your 2014 plans, get started now by contemplating changes you’d like to make in your personal life. Where will you focus attention in the coming year: career, finances, relationships, social life, contribution, travel, physical environment, learning & personal growth, or your physical, emotional, or spiritual health? Put some structure around it by creating goals and remember… business is there to support your life, not the other way around.

Now jump to your business plan. What does your five year vision look like? When you have that clearly identified, refocus on the coming year. What do you want? When do you want it? What key strategies will help you achieve it? What steps do you need to take? When do those steps need to be taken? Start answering those questions and you’re on your way.

The Truth About Engagement

The truth about engagement was troubling to learn.

Truth About EngagementSuccess magazine (one of my favorites) highlighted a Gallup workplace study about US employee engagement. Engaged, defined by the study as employees involved in, enthusiastic about and committed to their work, and who contribute positively to their organization, were at a low 30% at the end of 2012.

Okay, truth be told, I know employees aren’t happy and engaged. I continually interact and work with employees, so know their stories. It’s also been reported that women are leaving the workforce in droves to start their own businesses. That sure sounds like disengagement.

I reflected on my final dozen years working in the banking industry. Even while living through the chaos of repeated banking mergers, lack of engagement wasn’t anything close to 70%. My mind got curious and I wanted to find out a little more. It was interesting.
• Only 22% of employees are both engaged and thriving.
• The state with the most engagement was Louisiana at 37%. The lowest state was Idaho at 14%.
• There are two levels of disengagement : 50% show up but are checked out. They put in their time but have no energy or passion for their work. 20% are actively disengaged. They’re unhappy, act it out, and spread dissension.
Managers are key in employee engagement. “Managers from hell” create active disengagement, costing the US an estimated $450 – 550 billion annually. On the other hand, a great manager can virtually eliminate active disengagement and double the amount of engaged employees.

Engagement varies by organization, workgroup, industry, occupation, and personal characteristics such as length of service, age, education level, and gender. Some examples:
• Millennials are most likely to leave their job within a year if the market changes
• Generations at the beginning and near the end of their careers are often more engaged.
• Employees with degrees are less likely to have a positive and engaged experience
• Remote workers and women are slightly more engaged.
The somewhat good news is there’s been an increase in engagement between 2009 and 2012 (10% for managers/executives; 2% for professional employees).

A quote in the study resonated with me, as long as it’s meant with sincerity, not manipulation. “To win customers (and increase market share) companies must first win the hearts and minds of their employees.”

The quote took me back to my corporate days and the times I was more engaged than others? What was my truth about engagement? Who were the company leaders? Who were my managers? What was their role? Yes, my managers were important, but what responsibility did I take for my engagement, for my attitude, for asking for what I wanted, and for staying in a situation that wasn’t working for me?

My heart goes out to the millions who are passively or actively disengaged in the workplace. I hope they all find a way to bring more passion, joy, and engagement into their work.